About Your Water

United Water prides itself on meeting and exceeding all regulatory expectations for clean water.

Click here for important information about lead in your drinking water. 

Bergen and Hudson Water Supply and Treatment

These customers receive their water from four —reservoirs — Oradell, Woodcliff Lake and Lake Tappan reservoirs in Bergen County, New Jersey, and Lake DeForest Reservoir in Rockland County, New York. Our customers in Franklin Lakes receive water from wells located throughout that community or from our Haworth Water Treatment Plant. You may also receive treated water from United Water Jersey City, United Water New York, the Park Ridge Water Department, the Passaic Valley Water Commission, the Ridgewood Water Department or the North Jersey District Water Supply Commission.

Water Quality

We strive to provide you with water that meets or exceeds all water quality regulations. We constantly monitor the quality of your drinking water -- before, during and after the treatment process. We patrol the watershed and routinely test the water at our wells and in the rivers and streams that supply our reservoirs. We also test the water in each community we serve and provide the results to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

Surface Water
We treat surface water at our Haworth Water Treatment Plant. The process begins when we pump the water from the Oradell Reservoir into the plant. Then we add chemicals called coagulants to the water. This helps microscopic or suspended particles bind together to form larger particles. We do this because it's easier to remove larger particles from the water. Next the water is treated with ozone — a form of oxygen — to destroy bacteria, viruses and parasites. The ozone-treated water then flows to a flotation compartment. Here skimmers remove particles brought to the surface. After skimming, the water flows into a detention basin where large particles settle out. The water then enters a filtering chamber where it flows through layers of coal, sand and gravel to remove the smallest remaining particles. Next, we treat the water with a small amount of chlorine and ammonia to be sure that the water remains pure and safe as it travels to your home. Finally, we add corrosion control chemicals. This step helps prevent corrosion of water mains and household plumbing. It also reduces the chance of lead dissolving in the water from your plumbing.

Groundwater
Groundwater is purified naturally as it filters through layers of soil, clay, rock and sand. This process, known as "percolation", takes years to complete. As a result, groundwater requires less treatment than surface water. We pump groundwater out of the aquifer through a well. Then we add chlorine to destroy any bacteria and viruses in the water. Next, we add corrosion control chemicals. This step helps prevent corrosion of water mains and household plumbing. It also reduces the chance of lead dissolving in the water from your plumbing.

Our Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) provides detailed information about your water quality. You can download a portable document format (pdf) of our CCR:

 

Hunterdon County Water Supply and Treatment

The Swan Creek Reservoir, with a capacity of 40 million gallons, is the source of the Lambertville operations water supply. The system also maintains a 1 million gallons per day (MGD) back-up source of supply from the Delaware-Raritan Canal. The Hill Treatment Plant is a conventional surface water treatment plant with a capacity of 1 MGD. The treatment processes consists of chemical application of chlorine dioxide for pre-oxidation, sodium carbonate for pH adjustment, polyaluminumchloride for the coagulation and sodium hypochlorite for disinfection. Filtration is accomplished by single media high rate sand filters. Lambertville’s storage capacity includes three facilities.

Morris, Sussex and Passaic Counties Water Supply and Treatment

Customers receive water from wells located throughout the service area. Groundwater is purified naturally as it filters through layers of soil, clay, rock and sand. This process, known as "percolation", takes years to complete. As a result, groundwater requires less treatment than surface water. We pump groundwater out of the aquifer through a well. Then we add chlorine to destroy any bacteria and viruses in the water. Next, we add corrosion control chemicals. This step helps prevent corrosion of water mains and household plumbing. It also reduces the chance of lead dissolving in the water from your plumbing.

 

Mid Atlantic Region Consumer Confidence Reports: